No. 9

booth
3d mock up of the finished projection booth

Child’s Play No. 9

was a collaboration between ICDC and Yr 8 pupils from Shorefields School exploring space. Inspired by games to communicate navigation and journeys, participants developed the concept of a virtual 3 dimensional space, populated by visual and audio content created by participants, which could be navigated through via electronic sensors. The resulting installation was exhibited at Liverpool’s Writing on the Wall festival and the project was disseminated via conference presentations at FACT and Tate Gallery Liverpool and a written article in A’N’D magazine.

NOW project

Screen shot 2015-10-07 at 02.04.55
Main Interface

The NOW project was a collaboration between Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) sister Universities in Ireland, Greece, Italy and The European Social Fund. Its aim was to educate long term unemployed women in the emerging industries of new media, specifically through (what was then) industry standard software: Flash, Photoshop, Director, Infini-D, Soundedit 16 and Dreamweaver.

The NOW project was a collaboration between Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) sister Universities in Ireland, Greece, Italy and The European Social Fund. Its aim was to educate long term unemployed women in the emerging industries of new media, specifically through (what was then) industry standard software: Flash, Photoshop, Director, Infini-D, Soundedit 16 and Dreamweaver.

Pocket Pictures

Concept development and Project Management of folly Academy, a photo blogging collaboration between ICDC and media arts organisation folly, which engaged 5 groups of young people across rural Cumbria and Lancashire. Participants explored the creative possibilities of the mobile phone as a documentary, journal, social commentary and news gathering tool. View slideshow on flickr

LFC CD


Liverpool Football Clubapproached JMU Learning Methods Unit to create a multimedia CD-Rom, for commercial use. The CD would contain Interviews, games, memorabilia, videos, archive footage, club history etc.

Role 3D content creator, Area specific Director Programmer
Archive footage, old match programmes, badges, penants, kits, autographs were supplied by fans and collated and then digitized. Five rooms were created, each representing a decade from the 50s to the 90s. Objects in the room were interactive – old cine reels could be taken from a shelf and loaded onto a projector in the 50s room, for example by a simple click and drag method.

Role: Producer – 3D modeller, Director/Flash Programmer, Archivist, Researcher

BBC Jam

BBC Jam was an online educational service operated by the BBC. It was an initiative launched by the Government to provide computer-based learning in UK schools. ICDC Developed an online maths game. The music is deigned to allow a programmer to increase/decrease the number of tracks /instruments

V-MULE

V-mule

‘V-mule was a non-violent, multiplayer videogame that explored the potential learning aspects of these technologies. While the aims of the game are overtly to support the development of children’s thinking and collaboration skills, the scenarios into which they are immersed are more typical of commercial videogames than of traditional ‘edutainment’. Each prototype builds on the lessons learnt from the preceding ones, providing a far more informed and focused iterative production process. V-mule 1 (‘The Bridge’) tested collaborative gameplay mechanics and communication across networks, using a commercial 3D ‘engine’ for prototyping. V-mule 2 (‘October Island’) took a real disaster location of a volcanic island and provided players with detailed information on the historical, social and scientific aspects of this environment. This version used ‘Renderware’ by Criterion to create our own 3D engine. V-mule 3 (‘Team Rescue’) seeks to bring together this gameplay and scientific information into one cohesive and collaborative game experience. Common Features • Collaborative GameplayAll versions use gameplay mechanics that require more than one player to progress. For example, a retractable bridge requires ‘player one’ to step on a switch to expand it, so ‘player two’ can cross, and in turn step on another switch so the two can re-unite.

vmule2

Mentoring the promise of a reward is a vital form of motivation and empowerment within commercial games. Rewards can take many forms from improved capabilities to access to new areas. One reward structure V-mule is studying that of greater control and responsibility within the environment. Once a player has gained a certain level of expertise, they can become a Mentor. The Mentor has all the powers of a player plus extra control over environment. They can observe all the other players and interact with them. • Gathering Scientific DataThe environment contains underlying scientific data, which can be retrieved by the player using different sensors. The data can then be used as a gameplay mechanic for working out, for instance, a safe route for a survivor. • Different RolesEach player is part of a team and can play different roles within that team by either: 1. Carrying a piece of equipment that others cannot, having access to certain information that others have not, or 2. Having different strategies explained only to them. These roles are there to encourage debate and communication within the team. • Multiple SolutionsThe problems that each team have to complete have more than one answer to them, have better or worse solutions, not right and wrong ones and require iteration – every attempt to build a solution potentially changes the problem. 2004

LFC
Liverpool Football Club approached JMU Learning Methods Unit to create a multimedia CD-Rom, for commercial use. The CD would contain Interviews, games, memorabilia, videos, archive footage, club history etc.

60s
70s
80s
90s


Role 3D content creator, Area specific Director Programmer
Archive footage, old match programmes, badges, penants, kits, autographs were supplied by fans and collated and then digitized. Five rooms were created, each representing a decade from the 50s to the 90s. Objects in the room were interactive – old cine reels could be taken from a shelf and loaded onto a projector in the 50s room, for example by a simple click and drag method.